Corbyn’s victory: Labour Party in crisis

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By the end of the campaign for the leadership of the Labour Party, it was no surprise, even for his most stubborn and malevolent critics, that Jeremy Corbyn would win the election. But the scale of his victory, 59.5% in the first round, was a resounding shock. Despite the dire warnings of a string of Labour Party pro-imperialist grandees, 49.6% of party members supported Corbyn, as did 83.8% of registered supporters and 57.6% of affiliated union voters. The Blairite and openly ruling class candidate Liz Kendall was utterly trounced, obtaining a miserable 4.5% of the vote. Together, the other two establishment, pro-austerity candidates, Yvette Cooper and the one-time favourite to win, Andy Burnham, shared 36%.

The reactions were immediate. Within hours, the Conservative Party was presenting Corbyn’s politics as a threat to national security. The ruling class was outraged. Eleven shadow front bench members resigned, refusing to work with Corbyn. Their passing will not be mourned: among their number were Liz Kendall, Yvette Cooper, the openly reactionary shadow Works and Pensions Secretary Rachel Reeves, shadow education secretary Tristram Hunt and shadow business secretary Chuku Umunna, who had been a leadership candidate for 24 hours before passing the Blairite baton to Kendall. Good riddance to them. Most Labour MPs, an unprincipled bunch of frauds and self-serving careerists intent only on feathering their nests, were horrified at Corbyn’s success. 178 of them abstained in a parliamentary vote on the vicious benefit cuts announced in the July budget – they have only contempt for the plight of the poorest sections of the working class, despising them as scroungers and shirkers.

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New anti-trade union law: more shackles on the unions

May 2014: FRFI supporters demonstrating against benefit sanctions at Peckham Jobcentre

The government’s proposed new and draconian anti-trade union law has horrified the Labour Party as, apart from further limiting rights to strike, the bill contains proposals which will choke off union funding for the party. The aim of the legislation is to place even more shackles on the trade union movement before further savage cuts in public spending and consequent job losses take place. The Tories also aim to take advantage of the total lack of resistance trade unions have offered over the last five years of austerity and leave nothing to chance. Taking advantage of Labour’s disarray and threatening it with bankruptcy is a bonus. Robert Clough reports.

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Labour leadership contest - Jeremy Corbyn: social democracy’s last gasp

Jeremy Corbyn

It is impossible not to feel satisfaction at the extreme discomfort of Labour Party leaders as they look at the scale of Corbyn’s lead in the race for the leadership. A YouGov poll published on 22 July predicts Corbyn winning 43% of first preference votes and picking up sufficient preferences for an easy win in the fourth round. This has left those MPs from the right who nominated him hoping to discredit an anti-austerity standpoint looking very silly.

One thing needs to be clear: a victory for Jeremy Corbyn would not change Labour from what it is: a racist, imperialist, warmongering anti-working class party. Corbyn would be hostage to a parliamentary party which showed its true ruling class colours in the vote over the welfare bill. Nevertheless, already the knives are out, and there are threats of a coup in the unlikely eventuality of his victory and fresh leadership elections. None of the other three candidates – Liz Kendall, Andy Burnham and Yvette Cooper – want anything to do with him as they polish their ruling class credentials and show themselves to be even more pro-business than the Tories and as hostile to those forced to survive on inadequate welfare benefits.

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People's Assembly rally for Corbyn

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On Saturday 20 June, Revolutionary Communist Group (RCG) supporters attended the 'End Austerity Now' demonstration in London, called by the People's Assembly. Up to 150,000 people marched.

Following the addition of Jeremy Corbyn to the ballot for leader of the Labour Party, the People's Assembly attempted to turn the march into an election rally. Sam Fairbarn, General Secretary of the People's Assembly, was reported in The Guardian on 16 June as backing Corbyn and complaining that Burnham, Cooper and Kendall had refused to attend the march. Of Corbyn, he said ‘Jeremy is the only candidate who takes a principled anti-austerity, anti-war stance consistently’. This was followed by an article on 17 June by Chris Nineham, national officer of the Stop the War Coalition and a leading member of the People's Assembly, under the headline 'Corbyn is in the leadership race – don't just celebrate, organise!':

‘Getting Jeremy Corbyn onto the Labour leadership ballot was a breakthrough which opens up a big opportunity for the left in Britain...An ambitious, high profile campaign for Jeremy which draws on the movements against austerity, war and racism, can project radical ideas to a huge audience and build the forces of the left in every area.’

Yet Corbyn's 'principled stance' has not prevented him remaining a member of a Labour Party that in government has implemented savage austerity policies, murdered hundreds of thousands in imperialist wars, and when last in office boasted of deporting one person every eight minutes – all of this while he has been an MP. There is no chance Corbyn will win the leadership contest: he is simply a left cover its evermore reactionary character.

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Labour Party facing disintegration?

The outcome of the General Election may have been in doubt until the final moments, but the victory of the Conservatives following five years of punishing austerity for the working class demonstrates that the Labour Party presented no real opposition. It could not credibly reconcile its pro-austerity position with satisfying the needs of the working class and sections of the middle class. While it increased its support by one million votes across England and Wales, this was far short of the five million it had lost since 1997. With the trouncing it received in Scotland, losing 40 seats to the Scottish National Party (SNP), Labour ended up with 232 seats, 26 fewer than it had in the previous parliament. The Conservatives, with 331 seats, now have an unexpected overall majority of 12. ROBERT CLOUGH reports.

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