Muslim schools targeted by Islamophobia

Both the academies project started by Labour and the Coalition’s so-called ‘free school’ scheme have the goal of breaking up the state education system under Local Authority control. In this they have been successful, with the inevitable result that the £4 billion budget for ‘free’ schools is draining money away from Local Education Authorities, which are now forbidden to build or open new schools. Most recently, Education minister Michael Gove has been accused of raiding £400 million from a fund intended to safeguard local authority primary school provision to prop up his pet free school project.

 

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Education: Mr Gove exposes himself

Education Secretary Michael Gove has hit the headlines non-stop this year as he raises the banner of neo-conservatism over the heads of the coalition government to show that he stands for the interests of the right bloc.

Eton

In a bid to spike old Etonian Boris Johnson’s Tory leadership pretensions, Gove said that the number of Etonians (fees £33,000 a year) in government circles is ‘ridiculous’ and ‘I don’t know where you can find some such similar situation in a developed economy’. Gove’s usual cant is that the education system must be changed so that each child can be ‘the author of their own life story’. Lies and sentimentality hide the deep purposes of Gove, which are to dismantle and privatise state education, selling it off to profit-making businesses or giving it away to ideological friends. This is the real project behind his academy and ‘free’ schools programmes.

 

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Education notes - Eton College on Benefits Street

Fight Racism! Fight Imperialism! 237 February/March 2014

The unemployed and the working poor have been the targets of a vicious hate campaign whipped up by the ruling class and its servants in the British media, most recently with the furore over the Channel 4 documentary Benefits Street. This is ‘class war from above’. Combined with the racism directed against migrant workers from Eastern Europe, an atmosphere of hate, rivalry and fear dominates large sections of society. The ruling class is confident that it has defeated any challenge to cut state welfare to the bone, can blame the poor for the crisis and secure its privileged way of life. With silence and cunning it covers up the huge transfers of public money, massive subsidies and tax relief to their private finances.

 

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Education notes: Department for Education pimps for private business

‘A lobbyist is a pimp who wants to live out his life as a pimp. The money is good but the hours are terrible. Lobbyists will never admit that their organisation’s or company’s interest is not consonant with the best interests of the country.’ (Chuck Stone, King Strut, 1970)

A sizable chunk of Department for Education (DfE) money goes on ‘pimping’ by lobbyists, who come not from outside government to beg favours, but from inside government to offer favours. The attack on state education is being financed by state education and chief among the pimps are those well paid ‘brokers’ hired by the DfE to transfer the public sector into private ownership. Lobbyists for the privatising agenda, however, are finding it challenging to sell the idea of making corporate profits from schooling the working class. A recent leaked document from the DfE invites ‘the finest creative minds’ to join a series of small focus groups to generate ideas for deregulating the school system further. One proposal is for ‘self-managing’ schools with less oversight from the DfE, saving money, if legislative and process controls around the current system can be removed. We are well on the way to lobbyists promoting small, cheap schools, sponsored by local corner shops and run by unqualified adults, as the best defence against the heavy hand of state interference in the lives of our children, while at the same time helping to pay off the national debt.

 

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Students protest against cuts and privatisation, and in solidarity with university workers – December 2013

At the start of December 2013, lecturers in the University and College Union (UCU) staged a one-day strike over pay and conditions. Numerous university campuses were occupied, both in solidarity with the lecturers and in protest against privatisation of higher education and attacks on students’ right to organise. The management at various universities have responded with violence. On the evening of 4 December, at Malet Street in London students were savagely attacked by both university security guards and the police.

 

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Outsourcing yields very tasty profits

‘The future of the Empire, the triumph of social progress and the freedom of the British race depend not so much upon the strengthening of the Army as upon fortifying the children of the State for the battle of life.’ House of Commons debate on free school meals, 1905

Following the introduction of compulsory elementary education in Britain in 1870, school attendance was very low in impoverished areas. Those reformers who wanted a modern state system to match Britain’s industrial and military rival Germany united with progressive movements concerned with child poverty to demand the provision of a free hot school lunch to encourage poor pupils to attend. The 1906 Act empowered local authorities to spend money out of the rates to feed needy children.

 

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Education notes: The neoliberal blame game

A quick survey of end-of-term school reports this year would note the frequent use of the latest education jargon: ‘He/she must make the right choices … must think about the choices he/she makes’. This refers to time in and out of the classroom, to behaviour and to learning, whether the pupil is aged five or 15. It is a deliberate, strategic manoeuvre by the managers of capitalism everywhere to transfer responsibility for collapsing social services onto individuals, in what the US Monthly Review calls the ‘neoliberal blame game’.1 Blame deflects criticism from the ruling class and suggests that there are personality and motivational solutions to the crisis of public services. Nurses must be more ‘caring’; teachers must have higher ‘aspirations’; pupils must make better ‘choices’.

 

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Student loans for sale – everything must go

In June 2012 universities minister David Willetts told MPs: ‘In the letter that every student gets there are some words to the effect that governments reserve the right to change the terms of the loans. That is a text that has always been there for students, but we have no plans to change the framework we have explained to the House of Commons.’

 

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Privatisation of higher education

Across Britain, university services are being outsourced to private companies and the conditions of lecturers and staff are under attack, as private investors circle like vultures. However, a fightback is gaining force, having started earlier this year at Sussex University.

 

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Education notes: Education for sale

British education businesses conquer the world

Selling private education round the world is fast becoming a major British export as national governments fail to deliver state education to their people. This international trade is not just in schools, buildings and teachers but in selling off-the-shelf training, assessment, inspection and curriculum packages. An expanding number of countries including China, India, United Arab Emirates, Uganda, Kazakhstan, South Korea, South Africa, Nigeria, Pakistan and Ghana are buying in services from British multinational companies Gems, Education Solutions, CfBT, and Nord Anglia to resell to their citizens. Today 70% of Delhi’s schoolchildren attend British-based multinational for-profit schools, while over a million Chinese students a year sit the equivalent of imported and very English A-levels, more than the entire UK market.

 

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The rights of the disabled child – March 2013

Those who think that ‘political correctness’ is no more than a scheme to stop tasteless jokes about people who are perceived as different should think again. In the bleak days of the past children who were born with physical disabilities or learning difficulties were regarded with superstitious hatred and often locked away from the community. Campaigners fought for integrated schooling as the best option for the majority of children with special needs, including those with physical disabilities, and have largely been vindicated. The long struggle to include the rights of all in the rights of the child, irrespective of class, race, gender or ability was adopted and enshrined in the 1994 UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation) Salamanca Statement which described inclusive education as ‘combating discriminatory attitudes and creating welcoming communities’. Provision for a wide spectrum of children with learning needs was introduced into mainstream schools in the UK.

 

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Education Note: The ‘bad man’ theory of history

The task of socialists is to understand changes in society as the expression of class conflict and class interests and this should hold true in all cases. There are times, however, when the impact of one individual is so powerful, a Thatcher or a Blair, that it is a temptation to see unfolding events as the result of one bad man or woman. Today, Education Minister Michael Gove is that kind of man. He stands exposed as a villain, a fool, an opinionated right-wing enemy of the people single-handedly determined to destroy the British state education system.

 

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Education notes: Gove shrinks state education

Behind the summer’s headlines of ConDem ‘omnishambles’, in reality the Coalition government has been ruthlessly pursuing its real agenda – to shrink state education. Controversies over exam results, sports funding, junk food in academies, and dead-end free schools are media buzzes that Education Secretary Michael Gove will tolerate in pursuit of his goal – to break up, downsize and privatise as much of the state education system as possible. The chaos and misery that Gove leaves in his wake is of no concern to a government that embodies the rampant need of the capitalist class to find new sources of profitable investment.

 

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No armed forces in our schools

In recent months secondary schools across Glasgow have been the focus of British Army recruitment drives. As always it is the schools situated in the most predominantly working class areas that are given the most intense scrutiny. With unemployment figures on the rise, a career in the British Army is once again being touted as the way to escape the decimation of living standards. As an Army representative put it: ‘Employment with the Army represents a chance to see the world, to meet new people and defend the lifestyle you love ... it is a wonder that you are not paying us’.

 

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Academy schools: bribes and false promises

The rush for schools to convert into academies has reached fever pitch. The government anticipated that there would be about 400 schools, both secondary and primary, by now, but in two years 1,421 new academies, added to those set up under Labour, make a total of 1,807 – and rising. Academies are state-funded ‘independent’ schools that are taken out of local education authorities (LEAs); they may receive funds from charities, wealthy individuals, religious foundations or corporate sponsors. Michael Gove, the education secretary, plans to turn the majority of state schools into academies under this ConDem government. Although the main weapon for ‘turning’ schools is extra funding, cash bribery, Gove has also used emergency legislation (introduced by the Labour government for the purposes of anti-terrorism) to impose academy status on schools that refuse to change, like Downhills Primary School in Haringey (see FRFI 225).

 

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Plunder of the public purse

Education Notes

In the UK today the privatisation of the state education system leads directly to the distribution of spoils to individuals and groups favoured by the government. The Academies and ‘free’ schools programmes are designed to siphon off public money and Education Secretary Michael Gove has championed a system of patronage. One of his former advisers, Rachel Wolf, has become the latest in a long run of individuals to personally benefit from the privatisation of the education system. Wolf runs the New Schools Network, a so-called charity to promote ‘free’ schools; in reality devoted to the break-up the state system. The New Schools Network received a £500,000 grant from the Department for Education (DfE) for its work. No other organisation was asked to bid for the work and the role was not publicly advertised.

 

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